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All 'complications' in the birthing process, including hospitalization, arise from unfelt and unhealed emotions within you or someone in the birthing field. To understand this from a physiological perspective, it is important to know the function of two hormones: oxytocin and adrenaline.

Oxytocin release from the pineal gland is stimulated by the senses: dim and natural lighting, essential oils, relaxingmusic, sensual stimulation, massage, warm water, and most powerfully, prayer and love. It is especially stimulated in orgasm and breast feeding (which is one reason why nipple stimulation is helpful during labour).

Oxytocin emits endorphins that give us feelings of wellbeing, relaxation, connection, openness and joy. It releases opiates that decrease pain. It also stimulates rhythmic uterine rushes, present in both orgasm and labour. When a woman is held in an oxytocin rich environment, her physiology naturally unfolds and blooms into a blissful birth process. In essence, oxytocin is the hormone of being-ness, bonding, and love.

On the other hand, adrenaline is the hormone of doing and in many cases, fear. Adrenaline is released from the adrenal glands when our nervous system perceives a threat, or needs extra stimulus to respond to a need for action. Adrenaline cancels the effects of oxytocin, sending us into fight or flight mode.

In the heightened adrenaline state, pain is more intense, the primal thinking mind is activated (to make quick decisions), blood is drained from the womb, muscles tense in anticipation, breathing quickens and becomes shallower. This state of fear, tension and pain is not conducive to the necessary softening and opening of birth.

Adrenaline can be activated in the birth process in many ways. Firstly, if the container or field set for the birth is intruded upon, the mother will feel a compromised safety. This is why it is so important for the father to maintain the sanctity of the birthing space physically, emotionally, and spiritually.

When the woman viscerally feels the soundness of the masculine pillar and its protection, her mammalian brain is activated, bringing relaxation, creativity, and intuition. Here, she is totally attentive to the messages from her child and her body, and she can focus on her role in birthing, and what she needs to do.

This is one reason hospital births are more traumatic. The moment a couple leaves the safe and comforting home environment,the process of disconnecting a woman from her innate connection to her womb and birth has begun. Quick decisions, rushed transport and bright lights all stimulate the frontal brain or neo-cortex, pulling a woman out of her instinctual nature. The hospital initiates a downward cycle of artificial intervention in a natural process, and heightens the alienation of a woman from her body,her emotions, from her true self, and thus her birth.

Adrenaline may also be released in the birthing process if a woman has a history of sexual abuse or surgery. Any trauma still held in the cervix, womb, sexuality or yoni will be stimulated by the intense sensations and stretching of the womb in the birthing process.

The physical triggering of these emotions buried in the subconscious can trigger a response in the brain to stimulate a'fight-or-flight' reaction, which releases adrenaline into the bloodstream,over riding oxytocin and the softening and opening surrender necessary for a natural and joyful birth.

Ideally, these emotions will be addressed in pre-conception and pregnancy on all levels of the physical body, spirit, and soul. However, if they do arise in the labour process, they can be addressed quickly with breath, prayer, and strong desire to feel and release the underlying causal emotions.

Text © Shekinah Zorensky - All Rights Reserved.